home / Archivio / Fascicolo / Relations between collective agreements of different levels in Japan

indietro stampa articolo leggi fascicolo   


Relations between collective agreements of different levels in Japan

Shinya Ouchi. Full Professor of Labour Law at the Graduate School of Law at Kobe University

La traduzione in italiano dell’articolo è stata curata dalla Dott.ssa Marta Selicorni.

In Giappone, il problema delle relazioni tra i diversi livelli di contrattazione collettiva è inusuale, poiché c’è un unico livello di contrattazione ed è il livello aziendale. Quando il regolamento aziendale entra in conflitto con un contratto collettivo, quest’ultimo prevale sul precedente. L’art. 92, primo comma, della legge primaria del diritto del lavoro prevede che il regolamento aziendale non possa derogare alle regole stabilite nel contratto collettivo applicabile all’impresa. La ratio di questa scelta legislativa deriva dal diverso procedimento di formazione a cui tali atti sono sottoposti. La legge giapponese non prevede esplicitamente un principio del favor.

PAROLE CHIAVE: regolamento aziendale - contratto collettivo - conflitto

Rapporti tra contratti collettivi di diverso livello in Giappone

In Japan, it is not likely that the relation between collective agreements of different levels is in question, because there is unique level of collective agreement. It is enterprise level. When work rules conflict with a collective agreement, the latter prevails on the former. The Article 92, paragraph 1, of the Labor Standards Act provides that the work rules shall not infringe any laws and regulations or any collective agreement applicable to the workplace concerned. The Japanese law does not explicitly prescribe a “principio del favor”.

Keywords: enterprise level – collective agreement – conflict

Sommario:

1. Preface - 2. Legal framework on labor unions in Japan - 2.1. The Japanese Constitution and the Labor Union Act - 2.2. Provisions of the Labor Union Act - 2.3. Collective autonomy - 3. Actual situation of labor union in Japan - 4. Relations between collective agreements and work rules - 4.1. Legal framework - 4.2. Disadvantageous modification of working conditions - 5. Conclusion - 1. Prefazione - 2. Quadro giuridico della disciplina delle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori in Giappone - 2.1. La Costituzione giapponese e la legge sulle associazioni sindacali - 2.2. Le disposizioni contenute nella legge sulle associazioni sindacali - 2.3. L'autonomia collettiva - 3. Situazione attuale dei sindacati in Giappone - 4. Le relazioni tra i contratti collettivi e le norme del diritto del lavoro - 4.1. Quadro giuridico - 4.2. Le modifiche in peius delle condizioni di lavoro - 5. Conclusione - NOTE


1. Preface

In Japan, an issue “Relations between collective agreements of different levels” has been scarcely discussed. The reason for this is that main form of Japanese labor unions is enterprise union, which is organized primarily by regular employees of the same company [1], irrespective of the kind of the job. Of course, the law does not specify anything about form of organization of labor unions [2]. In fact, also in Japan, there are some industry unions like All Japan Dockworker’s Union and All Japan Seamen’s Union. Moreover, there are general unions composed mainly of workers not only of those small and medium sized companies where enterprise unions are not organized, but also of non-regular employees of those large companies where enterprise unions are organized. Among these general unions, labor unions organized on a regional basis beyond the boundaries of the enterprises are called “community union” and they are recently expanding power. However, from a quantitative viewpoint, industry unions, general unions and community unions still remain only marginal ones. Certainly many enterprise unions are affiliated to a confederation organized by industry. For example, the majority of the employees of the Toyota Motor Corporation are members of Toyota Motor Workers’ Union, and this Union affiliates with the Federation of All Toyota Workers’ Unions, and then this Federation affiliates with the [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2. Legal framework on labor unions in Japan

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.1. The Japanese Constitution and the Labor Union Act

In Japan, the current Constitution which was enacted in 1946 and took effect in 1947 provides that the right of workers to organize and to bargain and act collectively is guaranteed (the Article 28). Before the Constitution, the Japanese government enacted the Labor Union Act as early as December 1945. The General Headquarters Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (GHQ), which governed Japan after the Second World War ended on 15 August 1945, took measures to reform Japan into a peaceful democratic state, one of which was promotion of labor union formation. The Labor Union Act at that time had a rather regulatory character, however, in that the authority of administration was permitted to intervene in formation and activity of labor unions. In 1949, the Labor Union Act was amended under the pressure from the GHQ for the Japanese government to lead Japanese labor unions to be independent and democratic by removal of rapidly increasing influence of the communist forces.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.2. Provisions of the Labor Union Act

The Article 1, paragraph 1, stipulates the purpose of the Act, according to which the purpose of this Act is to elevate the status of worker by promoting their being on equal standing with their employer in their bargaining with the employer; to defend the exercise by workers of voluntary organization, subsidiary body of an organization and association in labor unions so that they may carry out collective action, including the designation of representatives of their own choosing to negotiate working conditions; and to promote the practice of collective bargaining, and procedures therefore, for the purpose of concluding collective agreement s regulating relations between employers and workers. The Article 2 prescribes the definition of Labor Union in the sense of this Act, according to which, the Labor Unions shall mean organizations formed voluntarily and composed mainly of workers for the purposes of maintaining and improving working conditions and raising the economic status of the workers. However, the Act shall not apply to any association which admits persons who represent the interests of the employer [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.3. Collective autonomy

Since the labor union law contains a lot of provisions, apparently the law intervenes deeply in the collective autonomy. However, the academic opinion tries to interpret the provisions not to intervene deeply in the collective autonomy. For example, as mentioned above, the Article 5, paragraph 2, which stipulates the items that should be included in the constitution of a labor union, has been interpreted not to have regulatory nature. Considering that formation and activities of labor unions are not subject to any administrative control, it may be safely said that at least from legal viewpoint the collective autonomy is respected in Japan. Moreover, it should be noted that though the Labor Union Act has been influenced by American Law, the exclusive representation system, which is one of its core systems, has not been introduced. As a result, in Japan two or more labor unions are entitled to request the collective bargaining to the same employer. In theory such a labor union pluralism is consistent with the collective autonomy, but in practice has often brought about delicate legal problems. I would like to point out two problems here. The first problem regards a discrimination among labor unions. For example, an employer tends to conclude a collective agreement with the one cooperative union, usually majority one, more favourable than that with the other adversarial union, usually minority one, and if not so, an employer often compels the [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3. Actual situation of labor union in Japan

According to the “Basic survey on Labour Unions, 2017” released by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare [4], the number of labor union members was 9,981 thousand, an increase of 41 thousand (0.4%) from 9,940 thousand in the previous year [5]. The number of union members peaked at 12,699 in 2004, and then it has been on a downward trend. The number of labor unions are 24,465, a decrease of 217 (0.9%) from 24,682 in the previous year. Most of labor unions in Japan are organized in individual companies, while industry unions are the minority as mentioned above. According to the “Basic survey on Labour Unions, 2017”, the number of union members who are part-time employees was 1,208 thousand, an increase of 77 thousand from 1,131 thousand in the previous year. Its share in the overall number of union members increased 0.8 points to 12.2%. This share continues to grow, which corresponds to the increase of the share of non-regular employees in the overall working population [6]. The estimated unionization rate was 17.1%, 0.2 points decrease from the previous year. Viewed by the number of employees in the private sector, the estimated unionization was 44.3% in enterprises with more than 1,000 employees, 11.8% in enterprises with 100 to 999 employees and 0.9% in enterprises with less than 100 employees. These figures show that in Japan labor unions are concentrated on large companies. The estimated unionization rate peaked at [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4. Relations between collective agreements and work rules

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4.1. Legal framework

In Japan, as a means of determining working conditions, work rules play a more important role than collective agreements. The Article 89 of the Labor Standards Act of 1947 obliges employers who continuously employ 10 or more workers at the workplace to draw up work rules and submit them to the Labor Standards Inspection Office. Employers should indicate in the work rules a wide range of working conditions such as working time, wage, retirement and dismissal, retirement allowances, safety and health, vocational training, accident compensation and support for injury or illness outside the course of the employment, commendations and sanctions, and other working conditions applicable to all workers. The main purpose of the Article 89 of the Labor Standards Act is to enable the Labor Standards Inspection Office to check whether the working conditions comply with labor protective laws. However, in practice work rules have played the other important role. In concluding employment contract, normally an employer offers working conditions through indicating in a lump those stipulated in work rules, instead of individually negotiating working conditions. Theoretically speaking, work rules are only a draft of contract, thus in order for them to have binding effect, it is necessary that employees consent the content of the work rules. But the Supreme Court, in 25 December 1968, ruled that work rules were binding without explicit consent of employees [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4.2. Disadvantageous modification of working conditions

According to the case law, the dismissal of a worker based upon the union shop clause is valid. This means that a labor union may conclude an agreement, which obliges the employer to dismiss those employees who are not a member of the labor union. Though the Article 16 of the Labor Contract Act provides that the dismissal should be objectively reasonable and socially acceptable, the Supreme Court ruled that the dismissal based upon the union shop satisfy these requirements, taking account of the necessity of strengthening the bargaining power of enterprise unions. Thanks to this case law, not a few enterprise unions stipulate the union shop clause with employers. In the company where there exists such a clause, the collective agreement concluded by the labor union covers almost all employee, who is in principle union member. In such a case, normally the company who intends to modify working conditions disadvantageously tries to revise the existing collective agreement at first and if that succeeds, it modifies the work rules according to the revised collective agreement. Through this mechanism, there is no conflict between a collective bargaining and work rules. However, also according to the case law, an effect of a union shop clause does not apply to union members of other labor unions. Since the Japanese Constitution guarantees the right to organize of the worker, any form of organization should be equally respected regardless of the number of union members. Therefore, [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


5. Conclusion

In Japan, it is not likely that the relation between collective agreements of different levels is in question, because there is unique level of collective agreement. It is enterprise level. On the contrary, there are different types of conflict problem; the conflict between the work rules unilaterally established or modified by an employer and a collective agreement, and the conflict between collective agreements of different labor unions which coexist at the enterprise level. Anyway the majority of Japanese workers are not covered by any collective agreement. But their working conditions are determined by the work rules, which the Labor Standards Act obliges employers to draw up. When enterprise unions exist, a collective agreement is superior to the work rules, but usually the work rules are established in line with the collective agreement. After all, the conflict problem hardly happened. The stance of the majority of enterprise unions is quite cooperative towards the company. The reason for it regards the fact that the information and consultation procedure within the company have highly developed. This procedure has created cooperative atmosphere which makes it easier to overcome economic difficulties encountered by the company.  The Japanese law strictly regulates the dismissal, while the disadvantageous modification of working conditions is quite easy, so long as the company succeeds in obtaining the consent of the majority union and the disadvantage is [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


1. Prefazione

In Giappone, il problema delle relazioni tra i diversi livelli di contrattazione collettiva non è stato molto discusso, poiché la forma di associazione sindacale più utilizzata è il sindacato d’impresa (o sindacato aziendale), che è composto primariamente dai lavoratori dipendenti a tempo indeterminato presso la stessa impresa [7], senza differenziazioni tra le diverse mansioni o tipologie di lavoro che essi svolgono. La legge non prevede nulla di specifico con riguardo all’organizzazione delle associazioni sindacali [8]. Infatti, anche in Giappone sono presenti alcune associazioni sindacali di settore, come l’associazione degli scaricatori di porto e l’associazione dei marinari. Inoltre, esistono associazioni sindacali generali (general unions) composte per la maggior parte da lavoratori non solo delle piccole o medie imprese, in cui i sindacati aziendali non sono organizzati, ma anche dai lavoratori c.d. non – regular (ossia i lavoratori che non hanno un contratto di lavoro subordinato a tempo indeterminato) delle grandi Società, in cui i sindacati aziendali sono organizzati. Tra queste general unions, i sindacati organizzati su basi regionali ovvero, in generale, aldilà dei confini delle imprese, sono comunemente chiamati sindacati di comunità (community unions) e stanno espandendo il loro potere. Tuttavia, da un punto di vista quantitativo, il sindacato di [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2. Quadro giuridico della disciplina delle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori in Giappone

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.1. La Costituzione giapponese e la legge sulle associazioni sindacali

In Giappone, la Costituzione, che è stata promulgata nel 1946 ed è entrata in vigore nel 1947, prevede la tutela del diritto dei lavoratori di associarsi, di contrattare e di agire collettivamente (art. 28). Prima dell’emanazione della Costituzione, il governo giapponese promulgò la legge sulle associazioni sindacali, nel dicembre del 1945. Il Comandante supremo del quartier generale delle forze alleate (General Headquarters for the Allied Power, GHQ), che governò il Giappone dopo la conclusione della seconda guerra mondiale, a partire dal 15 agosto 1945, emanò delle misure per riformare il Giappone in uno Stato pacifico e democratico, tra cui la promozione delle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori. A quel tempo, la legge sulle associazioni sindacali aveva un carattere prevalentemente regolamentare, tuttavia, l’Autorità amministrativa poteva intervenire nella formazione e nell’attività dei sindacati. Nel 1949 tale legge fu modificata sotto la pressione del Quartier generale (GHQ), il quale premeva affinché il Governo giapponese guidasse le associazioni sindacali a diventare indipendenti e democratiche, rimuovendo rapidamente la crescente influenza delle forze comuniste.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.2. Le disposizioni contenute nella legge sulle associazioni sindacali

Il primo comma dell’art. 1 della legge sulle associazioni sindacali, indica quali sono gli scopi perseguiti dalla disciplina di legge. Tali norme intendono migliorare le condizioni dei lavoratori, promuovendo condizioni di parità nella negoziazione con i datori di lavoro; difendere l’esercizio della libera organizzazione dei lavoratori (quale strumento sussidiario delle organizzazioni e delle associazioni sindacali affinché esse possano intraprendere azioni collettive); difendere la designazione di rappresentative che negozino le condizioni di lavoro e promuovere la pratica della contrattazione collettiva e le procedure atte a concludere contratti collettivi che regolino il rapporto tra il lavoratore e il datore di lavoro. L’art. 2 fornisce una definizione di “associazione sindacale dei lavoratori”, ai fini dell’applicazione della legge in esame. Essa viene intesa come una associazione formata volontariamente e composta soprattutto da lavoratori dipendenti, con lo scopo di mantenere e migliorare le condizioni di lavoro, oltre che di incrementare le condizioni economiche degli stessi lavoratori. Tuttavia, ai sensi della previsione legale, non possono qualificarsi come associazioni sindacali, le organizzazioni che ammettono l’iscrizione di rappresentanti dei datori di lavoro o che ricevono finanziamenti dal datore di lavoro per far fronte alle spese ordinarie dell’organizzazione. Infatti, il legislatore ha ritenuto [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2.3. L'autonomia collettiva

Apparentemente la legge è intervenuta a fondo nel regolare l’autonomia collettiva. Tuttavia, la dottrina prevalente interpreta le previsioni in modo da limitare al massimo l’ingerenza normativa nel regolare il contratto collettivo. Ad esempio, come specificato in precedenza, l’art. 5, secondo comma, della legge sulle associazioni sindacali (il quale elenca gli aspetti del contratto individuale di lavoro che devono essere necessariamente regolati da un contratto collettivo) è stato interpretato come una previsione derogabile. Considerando che l’organizzazione e le attività delle associazioni sindacali non sono soggette ad alcun controllo amministrativo, si può ritenere che in Giappone (almeno dal punto di vista normativo) l’autonomia collettiva è garantita. Inoltre, è bene sottolineare che nonostante la legge sulle associazioni sindacali sia stata influenzata dalla disciplina dell’ordinamento statunitense, il sistema di rappresentanza esclusivo (che è uno dei punti cruciali del sistema degli USA) non è stato introdotto. Il risultato è che, in Giappone, due o più sindacati hanno titolo per chiedere al medesimo datore di lavoro di sottoscrivere un contratto collettivo. In teoria questa pluralità garantisce l’autonomia collettiva, ma in pratica ha spesso introdotto problemi delicati nell’ordinamento giapponese. Vorrei evidenziare due problemi. Il primo [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3. Situazione attuale dei sindacati in Giappone

Secondo la “ricerca sulle associazioni sindacali, 2017” rilasciata dal Ministro della Salute, del Lavoro e del Welfare [10], il numero degli iscritti alle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori era di 9.981 migliaia, con un aumento di 41 migliaia (0.4%) dall’anno precedente [11]. Il numero di sindacati era 24.465, con una diminuzione di 217 unità (0,9%) dai 24.682 dell’anno precedente. La maggior parte delle associazioni sindacali in Giappone sono organizzate in sindacati d’impresa, poiché (come detto in precedenza) i sindacati di settore sono più rari. Sempre secondo la “ricerca sulle associazioni sindacali, 2017” il numero degli iscritti alle associazioni sindacali che sono lavoratori part-time era 1.208 migliaia, con un aumento di 77 migliaia dall’anno precedente. Questa quota (nel numero complessivo degli iscritti) è aumentata fino ad arrivare a raggiungere il 12,2 % degli iscritti ai sindacati. Inoltre, essa continua ad aumentare, in corrispondenza dell’aumento di lavoratori non-regular [12]. La sindacalizzazione stimata era del 17,1 %, con una diminuzione di 0,2 punti percentuali rispetto all’anno precedente. Invece, nell’ambito del settore privato, la sindacalizzazione stimata ha raggiunto il 44,3% nelle imprese con più di mille lavoratori dipendenti, il 11,8% nelle imprese con un numero di dipendenti che varia da cento a [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4. Le relazioni tra i contratti collettivi e le norme del diritto del lavoro

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4.1. Quadro giuridico

In Giappone, la disciplina del rapporto giuridico individuale svolge un ruolo più importante di quella collettiva come strumento per determinare le condizioni di lavoro. L’art. 89 della legge primaria del diritto del lavoro (del 1947) obbliga i datori di lavoro che impiegano stabilmente più di dieci dipendenti in ogni stabilimento a redigere un regolamento aziendale e a sottoporlo all’Ufficio ispettivo del lavoro. Il datore di lavoro deve indicare nel suindicato regolamento le condizioni di lavoro vigenti nell’impresa, quali l’orario di lavoro, le retribuzioni, le sanzioni disciplinari, le trasgressioni sanzionate con il licenziamento, le condizioni per accedere alla pensione, le norme sulla salute e sicurezza sul lavoro e sulla formazione permanente, il risarcimento del danno da infortunio e l’indennizzo dovuto per un infortunio avvenuto fuori dai luoghi di lavoro, encomi e tutte le restanti condizioni di lavoro applicabili ai lavoratori subordinati. L’obiettivo principale dell’art. 89 è di permettere all’Ufficio ispettivo del lavoro di controllare se le condizioni di lavoro dettate dal datore di lavoro rispettino la disciplina di legge. Tuttavia, nella pratica, i regolamenti aziendali hanno svolto un altro importante ruolo. Nel concludere un contratto di lavoro subordinato, normalmente un datore di lavoro offre le condizioni di lavoro semplicemente richiamando le regole contenute nel regolamento [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4.2. Le modifiche in peius delle condizioni di lavoro

Secondo la giurisprudenza, il licenziamento di un lavoratore determinato dalla c.d. clausola sindacale è valido. Ciò significa che una associazione sindacale può concludere un accordo che obbliga il datore di lavoro a licenziare i lavoratori che non sono membri della stessa associazione. Nonostante l’art. 16 della legge sul contratto di lavoro preveda che il licenziamento deve essere ragionevole e socialmente accettabile, la Corte Suprema ha stabilito che il licenziamento fondato sulla clausola sindacale soddisfa questi requisiti, considerando la necessità di rafforzare il potere contrattuale dei sindacati di impresa. Grazie a questo orientamento giurisprudenziale, non pochi sindacati di impresa hanno stipulato accordi contenenti una clausola sindacale. Nelle imprese in cui tale clausola esiste, i contratti collettivi conclusi da un sindacato si applicano alla maggior parte dei lavoratori dipendenti dell’impresa, poiché (almeno in principio) quei lavoratori sono iscritti a tale sindacato. In questi casi, normalmente, l’impresa che intende modificare i regolamenti aziendali in peius tenta di modificare prima i contratti collettivi vigenti e, solo in un secondo momento, modifica il regolamento aziendale in base alla nuova disciplina collettiva. Attraverso questo meccanismo si evita il conflitto tra il contratto collettivo e il regolamento aziendale. Tuttavia, la giurisprudenza ha anche stabilito che la clausola [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


5. Conclusione

In Giappone, il problema delle relazioni tra i diversi livelli di contrattazione collettiva è inusuale, poiché c’è un unico livello di contrattazione ed è il livello aziendale. Al contrario, vi sono altri tipi di conflitti che creano problemi: il conflitto tra i regolamenti aziendali stabiliti unilateralmente dal datore di lavoro o modificati dallo stesso e un contratto collettivo e il conflitto tra i contratti collettivi sottoscritti da diverse associazioni sindacali che coesistono a livello aziendale. In ogni caso, la maggioranza dei lavoratori subordinati in Giappone non è tutelata da alcun contratto collettivo. Le loro condizioni di lavoro sono determinate dai regolamenti aziendali, che i datori di lavoro sono obbligati a stipulare, ai sensi della disciplina della legge primaria del diritto del lavoro. Quando sono presenti i sindacati di azienda, il contratto collettivo prevale sul regolamento aziendale, ma solitamente le norme del regolamento aziendale sono stabilite in conformità con il contratto stesso. Pertanto, il problema del conflitto sorge raramente. La posizione della maggioranza dei sindacati aziendali è cooperativa nei riguardi dell’impresa, poiché le procedure di informazione e consultazione del sindacato si sono altamente sviluppate. Queste procedure hanno creato un clima cooperativo, che rende più facile superare le difficoltà economiche incontrate dalle imprese. La legge [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


NOTE

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


  • Giappichelli Social