home / Archivio / Fascicolo / The Law on Collective Barganing in Germany

indietro stampa articolo leggi fascicolo


The Law on Collective Barganing in Germany

Bernd Waas. Chair of Labour Law at the Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

The German collective bargaining law has specific features which sets them apart from many other jurisdictions: one of this features is the missing erga omnes effect of collective agreements. Over the last twenty years, there has been increasing decentralization of collettive bargaining mainly due to use of so-called “opening clauses”. The law currently in force protects to a large extent the legislative powers of the collective bargaining parties from agreements between the works council and the employer.

La traduzione in italiano dell’articolo è stata curata dalla Dott.ssa Marta Selicorni.

PAROLE CHIAVE: collective bargaining - effect of collective agreements - decentralization of collective bargaining

La disciplina del contratto collettivo in Germania

La legge tedesca sulla contrattazione collettiva ha caratteristiche specifiche che la distinguono da molte altre giurisdizioni: una di queste caratteristiche è la mancanza dell’effi­cacia erga omnes dei contratti collettivi. Negli ultimi vent’anni si è riscontrato un aumento del decentramento dei contratti collettivi, dovuto soprattutto all’uso delle c.d. clausole aperte. La legislazione vigente protegge principalmente i poteri normativi del contratto collettivo e delle parti sociali rispetto agli accordi che possono essere sottoscritti tra i consigli d’azienda e i datori di lavoro.

Parole chiave: contrattazione collettiva – efficacia soggettiva del contratto collettivo – decentramento della contrattazione collettiva

 

Sommario:

1. Introduction - 2. Basic features of collective labour relations - 3. The Law on Collective Bargaining - 3.1. Freedom of Association - 3.2. Ordinary Statutory Law and the Courts’ Case Law - 4. Levels of Collective Bargaining - 5. Collective Agreements and Works Agreements - 6. Conclusion - 1. Introduzione - 2. Caratteristiche principali delle relazioni industriali - 3. La disciplina legislativa sulla contrattazione collettiva - 3.1. Libertà di associazione - 3.2. La legge ordinaria e la giurisprudenza - 4. I livelli della contrattazione collettiva - 5. I contratti collettivi e gli accordi sottoscritti dal consiglio di azienda - 6. Conclusioni - NOTE


1. Introduction

In Germany, though, as in many other countries, there has been a certain erosion of collective bargaining, collective agreements still play an important role in fixing working conditions. In this paper the basic features of the German law on collective bargaining will be presented, focusing on the question of the level at which the conclusion of collective agreements takes place and the relationship between the different bargaining levels. Since in Germany, works councils also enjoy the right to conclude collective agreements, one has to broaden the scope of discussion, however, and to take a comprehensive view of the German system of collective labour relations (2). Subsequently, the German law on collective bargaining, including the requirements under constitutional law, the position of ordinary statutory law and the relevant case law of the courts will be presented (3). Against this background, the question of the levels of collective bargaining and their relationship with each other will be addressed (4), before discussing the relationship between the collective agreements concluded by trade unions and the collective agreements concluded by works councils (5). The paper will end with a short summary and some conclusive remarks (6).

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2. Basic features of collective labour relations

In contrast to many other countries inside and outside Europe, a so-called dual channel model of workers´ representation exists in Germany. On the one hand, interests of workers are represented by trade unions, on the other hand they are represented by works councils; the latter is referred to in Germany as the works constitution [1]. Both systems must not be confused: While the tasks and powers of trade unions are ultimately based on freedom of association as enshrined in Article 9 (3) of the German Constitution, legal status and powers of the works councils (Betriebsräte) are merely fixed by ordinary law, the Works Constitution Act (Betriebsverfassungsgesetz). While a trade union is an association under private law freely entered into by workers, a works council is a separate legal organ foreseen in the Works Constitution Act. The legitimacy of works councils stems from a democratic election held among the workers who belong to the company, not from any approval or confirmation by the trade unions represented in the company. The competence of a trade union extends the border of an individual company. The competence of a works council is limited to it. As will be described later, trade unions are legally acknowledged only if they are independent of the social counterpart [2]. Independence of works councils is guaranteed by statutory provisions that prevent the employer from interfering with the work of the works council. As will also be [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3. The Law on Collective Bargaining

German collective bargaining law is based on the constitutional guarantee of freedom of association in Article 9 of the Basic Law (Grundgesetz, GG), the German Constitution. This is the basis of the provisions of ordinary statute law in the Collective Bargaining Agreements Act (Tarifvertragsgesetz, TVG). But at least as important as these is the case law of the court

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3.1. Freedom of Association

Article 9(3) of the GG forms the pivotal point of a description of the German law on collective bargaining. Most important are Article 9(3) sentences 1 and 2 reading as follows: “The right to form associations to safeguard and improve working and economic conditions shall be guaranteed to every individual and to every occupation or profession. Agreements that restrict or seek to impair this right shall be null and void; measures directed to this end shall be unlawful.” If taken literally, Article 9(3) of the GG would guarantee freedom of associations to individuals only. In constructing Article 9(3), the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) has, however, transcended the wording by holding that the association itself is also a bearer of this fundamental right. For this reason, freedom of association is commonly referred to as being a twofold fundamental right (Doppelgrundrecht), which comprises both individual and collective freedom of association [5]. The wording of Art. 9(3) is too narrow in yet another aspect. The protection offered by the constitution by far exceeds the sole freedom of forming an association. It extends to a range of further activities, such as the freedom of joining an existing association as well as the engage freely in an association. At the same time, Art. 9(3) encompasses what is called “negative freedom of association” (negative Koalitionsfreiheit) which is the right to leave an association [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3.2. Ordinary Statutory Law and the Courts’ Case Law

Although Article 9 of the GG is of immense importance to collective bargaining law, the provision is worded so abstractly that it cannot provide all the essential features of this area of the law. Consequently, the focus has to move to the Collective Bargaining Agreements Act (TVG), but also to the decisions of the courts in this area. The fact that the latter are of such great importance, as will be shown immediately, is due to the fact that the TVG contains only a few, rudimentary rules and that a special responsibility for further substantiating the law is granted to the courts in this area. This will now be explained in more detail before discussing the basic features of collective bargaining law. a) The Role of Lawmakers and Courts As has been explained earlier, freedom of association of trade unions and employers´ associations and, in particular, the autonomy of the social partners in concluding collective agreements, is recognized and safeguarded by Article 9(3) of the GG. Nonetheless, there is a far-reaching responsibility of the state in this area. While it is true that the constitutionally protected autonomy of the social partners, it is also true that the state, due to the fundamental right of freedom of association, is under an obligation to provide the social partners with the tools to make collective bargaining actually happen. In this context, the Federal Constitutional Court repeatedly speaks of the task of the lawmaker to design an [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4. Levels of Collective Bargaining

Collective bargaining plays an important role in Germany. In 2016, 71.900 collective agreements existed, 491 of which were declared generally binding by the state [42]. In 2011, 60 p.c. of all workers in the West, and 48 p.c. of all workers in the East were subjected to a collective agreement if one also takes into account the relatively wide-spread use of so-called reference clauses. There has been a steady decline of collective bargaining coverage, however, since in 1998, the numbers were, 76 or 63, respectively. On the one hand, many employers have left employers´ associations or, in any event, opted-out of the system by becoming “OT-members”. On the other, union density has fallen considerably since the early 1990s, in part because of a sharp fall in manufacturing employment in Eastern Germany after unification. There are some 7.4 million trade union members in Germany. However, this includes a substantial number of retired trade union members. As a result, the ICTWSS database of union membership put union density at 18.0 p.c. in 2011 [43]. Most trade unions in Germany are organised on an industry basis (so-called principle of industrial organisation, Industrieverbandsprinzip). This means that they represent the interests of all employees working in a given industry or branch of activity rather than the interest of workers belonging to a certain profession. The principle of industrial organisation is enshrined in the standing rules [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


5. Collective Agreements and Works Agreements

Under section 1(1) sentence 1 of BetrVG, works councils are elected in companies) which regularly have at least five permanent employees. Though the election of works councils is mandatory, enforcement depends on employees or trade unions demanding an election. This is the reason why establishments, especially smaller establishments, are often without a works council. In big companies, however, mostly works councils exist. In total 43 p.c. of workers in the West and 24 p.c. of workers in the East are represented by works councils [48]. The works councils in Germany have vast powers ranging from information and consultation rights to co-determination rights. Pursuant to section 87(1) of the BetrVG, the works council participates in the determination of a variety of social matters, to the extent that they are not already regulated by statute or collective bargaining agreements. The major instrument of participation of works councils the conclusion of a so-called works agreement (Betriebsvereinbarung). According to section 77 (4) of the BetrVG, works agreements have direct and mandatory effect on the individual employment relationships. As is the case with a collective agreement, a works agreement need not to be formally incorporated into the individual employment contracts. And similar to a collective agreement, the employer and the individual employee are not allowed to deviate from the works agreements to the disadvantage of the employee, unless the works council [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


6. Conclusion

The German collective bargaining law has specific features which sets them apart from many other jurisdictions: One of this features is the missing erga omnes effect of collective agreements. Over the last twenty years, there has been increasing decentralisation of collective bargaining mainly due to the use of so-called “opening clauses”. As Germany has a dual model of workers´ representation, there is always the question of drawing a line between the competences of the trade unions and the works council. The law currently in force protects to a large extent the legislative powers of the collective bargaining parties from agreements between the works council and the employer.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


1. Introduzione

In Germania, nonostante – come in molte altre nazioni – si sia verificata una erosione della contrattazione collettiva, i contratti collettivi hanno ancora un ruolo importante nel predeterminare il contenuto dei contratti individuali di lavoro. In questo articolo saranno presentate le caratteristiche basilari della disciplina di legge tedesca riguardante la contrattazione collettiva, soffermandosi sulla relazione tra i diversi livelli di contrattazione. In Germania anche i consigli di azienda (Betriebsrӓte) possono concludere accordi collettivi; pertanto è necessario ampliare l’oggetto di questa discussione e dare una visione comprensiva dell’intero sistema tedesco delle relazioni industriali. Successivamente, verrà esaminata la disciplina normativa tedesca sulla contrattazione collettiva, facendo riferimento ai principi costituzionali, al ruolo della legge ordinaria e alle pronunce rilevanti delle Corti giudiziarie. A questo punto, ci si porrà la domanda di quali relazioni intercorrono tra i livelli di contrattazione collettiva, partendo dalla analisi della relazione tra i contratti collettivi conclusi dalle associazioni sindacali e quelli conclusi dai consigli di azienda. Questo articolo si concluderà con un piccolo riassunto e alcune osservazioni conclusive.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


2. Caratteristiche principali delle relazioni industriali

Contrariamente a molte altre nazioni (europee e non europee) in Germania esiste un doppio canale di rappresentanza dei lavoratori. Da un lato l’interesse dei lavoratori è rappresentato dalle organizzazioni sindacali, dall’altro essi sono rappresentati anche dai consigli di azienda; questi ultimi in Germania svolgono compiti di cogestione aziendale [56]. I due sistemi non devono essere confusi: mentre i compiti e i poteri dei sindacati sono basati principalmente sulla libertà di associazione, così come prevista dall’art. 9, terzo comma, della Costituzione tedesca, la qualificazione legale e i poteri dei consigli di azienda sono stabiliti dalla legge ordinaria e, in particolare, dalla legge costituzionale sul lavoro (Betriebsverfassungsgesetz). Mentre un sindacato è una associazione privata, a cui possono liberamente iscriversi i lavoratori, un consiglio di azienda è un organo separato previsto dalla legge costituzionale sul lavoro. La legittimazione dei consigli di azienda deriva da una elezione democratica tenuta tra tutti i lavoratori dipendenti di un’impresa e non necessita di una approvazione o di una conferma da parte delle associazioni sindacali che sono presenti nella medesima impresa. La competenza delle associazioni sindacali si estende anche oltre i confini di una impresa, mentre la competenza dei consigli di azienda è limitata all’impresa stessa. Come si dirà successivamente, le [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3. La disciplina legislativa sulla contrattazione collettiva

La legge tedesca sulla contrattazione collettiva è fondata sulla garanzia costituzionale della libertà di associazione di cui all’art. 9 della Costituzione (Grundgesetz, GB). Questa norma è il fondamento della disciplina contenuta nella legge ordinaria sulla contrattazione collettiva (Tarifvertragsgesetz, TVG). Tuttavia, oltre alla dimensione eteronoma, la giurisprudenza svolge un ruolo fondamentale – se non di pari – importanza.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3.1. Libertà di associazione

L’articolo 9, comma terzo, della Costituzione tedesca (GG) fornisce il punto cruciale della descrizione della legge tedesca sulla contrattazione collettiva. Il primo e il secondo periodo di tale norma riportano quanto segue: “Il diritto a formare associazioni che tutelino e migliorino le condizioni di lavoro e le condizioni economiche dei lavoratori subordinati deve essere garantito a ciascun individuo e nell’ambito di ciascuna occupazione o professione. Gli accordi che restringono o cercano di danneggiare tale diritto sono nulli e sono vietati; le operazioni dirette a restringere o danneggiare questo diritto sono illegittime.” Se interpretato letteralmente, l’articolo 9, comma terzo, della Costituzione tedesca (GG) garantirebbe la libertà di associazione ai soli individui. Tuttavia, nell’interpretare tale disposizione, la Corte Costituzionale Federale (Bundes­verfassungsgericht) ha ritenuto che anche le associazioni siano portatrici di questo diritto fondamentale. Per questa ragione, la libertà di associazione è comunemente descritta come un duplice diritto fondamentale (Doppelgrundgericht), che comprende sia la libertà individuale, sia la libertà collettiva di associarsi [60]. Il testo dell’art. 9, terzo comma, può sembrare restrittivo anche in un altro aspetto: la protezione offerta dalla Costituzione, infatti, è di gran lunga superiore alla sola libertà di formare [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


3.2. La legge ordinaria e la giurisprudenza

Nonostante l’articolo 9 della Costituzione tedesca sia di immensa importanza per la materia della contrattazione collettiva, tale previsione normativa è generale e astratta e non può fornire tutte le caratteristiche essenziali di questa materia. Di conseguenza, la nostra attenzione deve spostarsi sulla legge in tema di contrattazione collettiva (Tarifvertragsgesetz, TVG), ma anche sulle decisioni giurisprudenziali. Queste ultime sono di fondamentale importanza, perché, come si spiegherà successivamente, la normativa sulla contrattazione collettiva (TVG) contiene solo alcune regole rudimentali e, quindi, in questo settore la giurisprudenza ha la responsabilità di consolidare l’impianto legale. Di ciò si tratterà dettagliatamente prima di descrivere le caratteristiche fondamentali della normativa sulla contrattazione collettiva. a) Il ruolo del legislatore e della giurisprudenza Come esplicitato in precedenza, la libertà di associazione garantita alle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori e dei datori di lavoro e, in particolare, l’autonomia delle parti sociali nel concludere contratti collettivi, è riconosciuta e tutelata dall’art. 9, terzo comma, della Costituzione tedesca. Ciò nonostante, lo Stato ha una vasta responsabilità in questo ambito. Se è vero che la Costituzione protegge l’autonomia delle parti sociali, è anche vero che lo Stato, a causa [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


4. I livelli della contrattazione collettiva

I contratti collettivi hanno un ruolo importante nel sistema delle relazioni industriali tedesco. Nel 2016 sono stati stipulati 71.900 contratti collettivi, 491 dei quali sono stati dichiarati efficaci erga omnes dallo Stato [97]. Nel 2011 il 60% di tutti i lavoratori dipendenti della parte Ovest della Germania e il 48% di tutti i lavoratori dipendenti della parte Est della Germania sono stati soggetti alla disciplina dei contratti collettivi (anche se deve essere tenuto conto del largo utilizzo delle clausole di rinvio ai contratti collettivi). Tuttavia, si registra un costante declino della copertura dei contratti collettivi, poiché nel 1998 i dati erano rispettivamente il 76% e il 63%. Da un lato, molti datori di lavoro disdetto l’iscrizione alle associazioni sindacali di riferimento o hanno optato per il sistema della OT – Mitgliedschaft. D’altro canto, invece, la densità delle associazioni sindacali è diminuita considerabilmente sin dai primi ani Novanta. In parte essa è dovuta alla diminuzione della produzione di lavoro nella Germania dell’Est dopo l’unifi­ca­zione delle due Germanie. Tuttavia, bisogna considerare anche il fatto che molti storici membri delle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori sono andati in pensione. Ne risulta una densità delle associazioni sindacali pari al 18% nel 2011 [98]. La maggior parte delle associazioni sindacali in Germania è [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


5. I contratti collettivi e gli accordi sottoscritti dal consiglio di azienda

Il primo periodo del primo comma dell’art. 1 del Betriebsverfassungsgesetz (BertVG) precisa che i consigli di azienda sono eletti nelle imprese che regolarmente occupano almeno cinque lavoratori. Nonostante l’elezione del consiglio di azienda sia obbligatoria, la sua reale applicazione è subordinata alla richiesta di elezioni promossa dai lavoratori o dalle associazioni sindacali. Questa è la ragione per cui le imprese (e, in particolar modo, le imprese più piccole) sono spesso prive di un consiglio di azienda. Nella maggior parte delle grandi Società, invece, sono presenti i consigli di azienda. In totale, il 43% dei lavoratori nell’Ovest della Germania e il 24% nell’Est sono rappresentati dai consigli di azienda [103]. I consigli di azienda in Germania sono dotati di vasti poteri, che variano dai diritti di informazione e consultazione, sino al diritto di codeterminazione. Ai sensi dell’art. 87, primo comma, del BertVG i consigli di azienda partecipano alla determinazione delle questioni aziendali, nella misura in cui esse non sono regolate dalle norme o dal contratto collettivo. Il maggiore strumento di partecipazione dei consigli di azienda è rappresentato dalla conclusione delle pattuizioni aziendali (Betriebsvereinbarung). Secondo l’art. 77, comma quarto, del BertVG tali pattuizioni hanno un effetto diretto e vincolante sui rapporti di lavoro individuali. Come nel caso [continua ..]

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


6. Conclusioni

La legge tedesca sulla contrattazione collettiva ha caratteristiche specifiche che la distinguono da molte altre giurisdizioni: una di queste caratteristiche è la mancanza dell’efficacia erga omnes dei contratti collettivi. Negli ultimi vent’anni si è riscontrato un aumento del decentramento dei contratti collettivi, dovuto soprattutto all’uso delle c.d. clausole aperte. In Germania esistono due modelli di rappresentanza dei lavoratori, pertanto sorge il problema di distinguere le competenze delle associazioni sindacali dei lavoratori e quelle dei consigli di azienda. La legislazione vigente protegge principalmente i poteri normativi del contratto collettivo e delle parti sociali rispetto agli accordi che possono essere sottoscritti tra i consigli di azienda e i datori di lavoro.

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


NOTE

» Per l'intero contenuto effettuare il login inizio


  • Giappichelli Social